Americans learn haka for grieving Kiwi colleague

An emotional video has gone viral on the internet after a group of American friends secretly learned the haka for their New Zealand colleague who had recently lost his grandmother.

Jarom Ngakuru, a New Zealand Māori living in the United States, said he was “devastated” when he was unable to make it home to attend his grandmother’s funeral.

According to MAI FM, in a touching gesture, his colleagues surprised him with the traditional dance after teaching it to themselves in just one day.

In a video shared on TikTok, the group can be seen performing the haka for Mr Ngakuru, who appeared emotional as he briefly watched in the corner of the room.

Moments later, Mr Ngakuru is seen joining in before being hugged by one of his work colleagues.

“The worst thing about living in America is that we live so far away. I couldn’t make it home for my grandma’s funeral and I was DESTROYED!” Mr. Ngakuru captioned the video.

“So my boys learned the Haka at work without me knowing and brought it home to me.”

The video was viewed over three million times and many people said they had goosebumps after the emotional performance.

“I don’t think they even understand what a wonderful act this is,” one person wrote.

“I cry every time I see a haka. I feel so honoured,” said another.

“Am I the only one who gets goosebumps and tears every time I see the Haka

carried out?” wrote another.

“This is so beautiful,” said another.

The haka is a traditional Māori dance performed on important occasions such as sporting events, funerals and powhiri (a traditional greeting).

Last month, footballer Dallin Watene-Zelezniak celebrated his 200th NRL game by performing the Haka after the Warriors’ win over the Penrith Panthers.

Watene-Zelezniak performed the dance on the sidelines with a large group of his family and friends sitting in the stands.

“We’re seeing some great scenes here,” Corey Parker said on Fox League.

“Unvarnished and emotional, the 200th game for DWZ. The respect shown by friends and family.

“His teammates will do something very similar. No matter how the Haka turns out, it gives you goosebumps.”

Leave a Comment

URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL URL